If you are considering having an outdoor insect control misting system installed in an area they need to ask themselves what type of solution is best for them.

Mr. Mist Systems offers the use of a number of types of insecticides which are all pyrethroid based solutions that are water based emulsifiable concentrates.  Riptide and Vampyre are forms of insecticide that use varying percentages of pyrethrin as the active ingredient and PBO as the synergist.  Pyrethrin is a natural insecticide derived from the extract of chrysanthemum flowers.   It is a nerve toxin the insects and it is metabolized easily by mammals.  Yet, it is not recommended to be around a nozzle when the diluted solution is misted.   Finally, it rapidly degrades in the environment which is why it is used so widely in insect control misting systems.

Sector is a pyrethroid based ingredient called permethrin along with PBO as the synergist.  Permethrin is the synthetic version of pyrethrin.  It is similar to pyrethrin except for the following traits.  It is synthetic and not natural, it last longer in the environment giving it a greater residual effect.

Both pyrethrin and permethrin can be toxic to fish and tadpoles if it is dumped into a body of water.   Both of the solutions can be used in a tank or a tank-less system with great result and longevity to the life of the pump.

Mr. Mist Systems also offers “green” options.  These are solutions that the EPA does not need to inspect because of the active ingredient that is in it.  Naprovit Pro Plus about 20% less effective at killing mosquitoes than the pyrethroid based insecticide solutions and must be sprayed twice as much per day.  Yet, this product is completely “safe” to humans as well as fish and tadpoles.  This solution is easy on the system and the lines because since it is basically soap.  As a result, the nozzle tips last longer with this solution.  The result is a quicker time needed to replace all the seals within the system.  The Naprovit Pro Plus dehydrates the chitin of the insect, which is their outer layer, and causes them to dehydrate.